Publications by Year: 2017

2017
Lars Erik Berntzen, Lise Bjånesøy, and Elisabeth Ivarsflaten. 2017. “Patterns of Legitimacy on the Far Right”. Working paper 2017:4
Sveinung Arnesen and Yvette Peters. 2017. “The Legitimacy of Representation. How Descriptive, Formal, and Responsiveness Representation Affect the Acceptability of Political Decisions.”. Working paper 2017:3
Sveinung Arnesen, Mikael Johannesson, Jonas Linde, and Stefan Dahlberg. 2017. “Do Polls Influence Opinions?”. Working paper 2017:1
Magnus Hoem Iversen and Erik Knudsen. 2017. “I've Got Our News and Bad News: Party Cues Trump Negativity Bias When Selecting Political News Online”. Working paper 2017:2
Sveinung Arnesen. 2017. “Legitimacy from Decision-Making Influence and Outcome Favorability: Results from General Population Survey Experiments..” Political Studies . Find at journalAbstract
Democracies are typically considered more legitimate than other types of regimes because they allow the citizens to participate in the policy decision-making process. Others argue that the policy output matters most, and citizen influence plays a lesser role. This study presents two survey experiments on the micro foundations of these two sources of political legitimacy, thus contributing to an emerging literature that experimentally investigates the effects of democratic procedures in small-scale settings. Respondents who saw the decision going in their favour found the decision much more acceptable than the respondents who preferred another outcome. Conversely, decision-making influence generally did not serve as a legitimising factor among the respondents. This result supports the argument that citizens prefer a stealth democracy where they are minimally involved in democratic decision-making processes.
Magnus Hoem Iversen and Erik Knudsen. 2017. “When Politicians Go Native: Consequences of Native Advertising for Citizens' Trust in Political News.” Journalism. Fukuoka. Find at journalAbstract
Declining revenues from offline and online ads has led publishers to pursue new avenues, such as native advertising: camouflaging ads as news. Critics of native advertising claim that this form of advertising blurs the boundaries between editorial and commercial content, and can reduce the audiences’ trust in editorial content. However, little research has assessed the possible effects of native ads on audiences’ trust in news. With an experimental design embedded in an online survey (N = 733) representative of the Norwegian population, this study explores the consequences of political native advertising for citizens’ trust in political news. This article discusses how political native advertising poses a challenge to the boundary between journalism and advertising as well as the boundary between journalism and powerful elites. Our study examines (1) how prominently native advertisements should be labelled in order for readers to recognize them as advertising content and (2) whether exposure to such ads reduces readers’ trust in political news. Our most important finding shows that when explicitly labelled, native advertising by political parties can reduce people’s trust in political news.