About DIGSSCORE

The Digital Social Science Core Facility (DIGSSCORE) is an infrastructure for advanced social science data collection and multi-disciplinary research at the University of Bergen. DIGSSCORE extends the successful probability-based internet-panel which was established at the University of Bergen in 2012, The Norwegian Citizen Panel, and integrates it with a fully equipped on-site social science digital research lab, The Citizen Lab, from August 2016. The facility takes advantage of changes in technology and research methodology that combine to bring computer laboratory research and survey studies ever closer together. The Citizen Lab resides in Rosenbergsgaten 35, at the University of Bergen.

Submit Proposal

We accept proposals for survey experiments to be included in the Norwegian Citizen Panel.

If/when your proposal is accepted, we will find a time for your experiment. The Citizen Panel will run three rounds per year. Click here to submit a proposal or get more information.

Participation in lab experiments

http://pahoyden.no/2016/11/soker-fleire-deltakarar-til-medborgarlaben

Would you like to participate in social science experiments and contribute to exciting research?

Join the pool of participants for the Citizen lab here.

The Citizen lab (Medborgerlaben) is a computer lab facility in the 2nd floor of Sofie Lindstrøms hus, Rosenbergsgate 35. As a participant of the Citizen lab-pool, you will get invitations by email. Participants often receive payment for taking part in the experiments. Some experiments are in Norwegian, other will be in English.

Find out more about the lab here.


 

Recent Publications

Magnus Hoem Iversen and Erik Knudsen. 2017. “When Politicians Go Native: Consequences of Native Advertising for Citizens' Trust in Political News.” Journalism. Fukuoka. Find at journalAbstract
Declining revenues from offline and online ads has led publishers to pursue new avenues, such as native advertising: camouflaging ads as news. Critics of native advertising claim that this form of advertising blurs the boundaries between editorial and commercial content, and can reduce the audiences’ trust in editorial content. However, little research has assessed the possible effects of native ads on audiences’ trust in news. With an experimental design embedded in an online survey (N = 733) representative of the Norwegian population, this study explores the consequences of political native advertising for citizens’ trust in political news. This article discusses how political native advertising poses a challenge to the boundary between journalism and advertising as well as the boundary between journalism and powerful elites. Our study examines (1) how prominently native advertisements should be labelled in order for readers to recognize them as advertising content and (2) whether exposure to such ads reduces readers’ trust in political news. Our most important finding shows that when explicitly labelled, native advertising by political parties can reduce people’s trust in political news.
Sveinung Arnesen, Mikael P Johannesson, Jonas Linde, and Stefan Dahlberg. 2017. “Do Polls Influence Opinions? Investigating Poll Feedback Loops Using the Novel Dynamic Response Feedback Experimental Procedure.” Social Science Computer Review. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Opinion polls may inadvertently affect public opinion, as people may change their attitudes after learning what others think. A disconcerting possibility is that opinion polls have the ability to create information cascades, wherein the majority opinion becomes increasingly larger over time. Testing poll influence on attitudes toward Syrian refugees and mandatory measles vaccination, we field survey experiments on a probability-based online survey panel. Through a novel automated procedure labeled the dynamic response feedback, we measure whether the answers from early poll respondents can influence the opinions of subsequent respondents who learn the answers of the previous respondents. Using this procedure, no feedback loops are identified.
Dag Arne Christensen and Jacob Aars. 2017. “Nordmenns Holdninger Til Telefonavlytting: Resultater Fra Et Surveyeksperiment.” Tidsskrift for Samfunnsforskning, 2, 58: 191-209. Read hereAbstract
One of the basic functions of the state is to provide security for its citizens, with mitigating fear an important element of counter-terrorist policies. Policies like this may in turn reflect citizens' psychological reactions to terrorist events. Terrorism often leads to increased intolerance towards groups perceived as «different». Here, we ask whether people’s perceptions of the use of wiretapping differ depending on who the target of these measures is. For example, do citizens differ clearly between radical Muslims and Muslims in general, or has fear of terror contributed to a general distrust of Norwegian Muslims? We also ask why some are ready to give the police leeway in using secret methods, while others are reluctant. In order to answer these questions, we conducted a survey experiment and found that the population's support is highly dependent on the target group of the portended wiretap. However, although the respondents’ attitudes are sensitive to exposure to target groups, our study rejects the assumption that fear of terrorism has led to low tolerance towards Muslims in general. Finally, citizens' willingness to allow wiretapping is dependent on the characteristics of the inhabitants themselves. Keywords: Terrorism, surveillance, privacy, group thinking, survey experiment Staten har en oppgave i å skape trygghet for innbyggerne. Det å avdempe frykt er et viktig element i antiterrorpolitikken, og denne politikken kan i sin tur reflektere innbyggernes psykologiske reaksjoner på terrorhendelser. Forskning, spesielt fra USA, viser at terrorfrykt er assosiert med økt intoleranse og sterke fordommer overfor grupper som oppfattes som «annerledes». Med dette som utgangspunkt spør vi om nordmenn setter grensen for bruk av telefonavlytting forskjellig, avhengig av hvem som er målgruppen for slik avlytting. For eksempel, skiller innbyggerne tydelig mellom radikale muslimer og muslimer generelt, eller har terrorfrykten bidratt til en generell mistro mot norske muslimer? Vi spør også hvorfor noen er tilbøyelige til å gi Politiets Sikkerhetstjeneste (PST) et stort handlingsrom, mens andre er motstandere. Disse spørsmålene besvares med bakgrunn i et surveyeksperiment gjennomført høsten 2015. Vi finner at hvilke grupper PST ønsker å bruke telefonavlytting overfor, har stor betydning for befolkningens støtte til slik avlytting. Våre resultater tyder derimot ikke på at terrorfrykt gir lavere toleranse overfor muslimer som gruppe. Innbyggernes villighet til å gi PST det PST ønsker er også i høy grad betinget av kjennetegn ved innbyggerne selv. Nøkkelord: Terrorisme, overvåking, personvern, gruppekategorisering, surveyeksperiment
Cornelius Cappelen and Stefan Dahlberg. 2017. “The Law of Jante and Generalized Trust.” Acta Sociologica. Download article hereAbstract
A widespread cultural phenomenon – and/or individual disposition – is the idea that one should never try to be more, try to be different, or consider oneself more valuable than other people. In Scandinavia this code of modesty is referred to as the ‘Jante mentality’, in Anglo-Saxon societies the ‘tall puppy syndrome’, and in Asian cultures ‘the nail that stands out gets hammered down’. The study reported here examines how this modesty code relates to generalized trust. We argue, prima facie, that a positive and a negative relationship are equally plausible. Representative samples of the Norwegian population were asked about their agreement with the Jante mentality and the extent to which they have trust in other people. Two population surveys were conducted; one measuring individual level associations and another measuring aggregate level associations. It was found that the relationship between having a Jante mentality and trust is negative, at both levels of analysis and, furthermore, that the Jante mentality – this modesty code assumed to be instilled in Scandinavians from early childhood – is a powerful predictor of generalized trust.
More publications

Arendalsuka

Norsk medborgerpanel på Arendalsuka from UiB - Universitetet i Bergen.

The Citizen Panel is responsible for a large part of the dissemination from the University of Bergen at Arendalsuka, august 2017. You can see more of that project in the video you find above, and read about it here (in Norwegian).

We also have a collobaration with Bergens Tidende, regarding dissemination of results from the Citizen panel, before the election 2017. You can read more about that here (in Norwegian).

Upcoming Events

Oct 24

Tuesday lunch: Rune Slothuus

Date: 

Tuesday, October 24, 2017, 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

Corner room, DIGSSCORE

Rune Slothuus from Aarhus University will present today.

A light lunch will be served.

More